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Germany increases offshore ambition - updated

Germany increases offshore ambition - updated

Germany aims to have 20GW of offshore wind capacity by 2030, before ramping up to 40GW by 2040, under a new draft bill unveiled by the government.

Covid-19 update: UK businesses call for green recovery

Covid-19 update: UK businesses call for green recovery

How the global coronavirus (Covid-19) pandemic is impacting the industry's 盈彩彩票app goals.

RWE and Sumitomo target offshore wind off Akita

RWE and Sumitomo target offshore wind off Akita

Interest is growing in offshore wind off the coast of Akita prefecture in the north-west of Japan’s main island, with groups led by RWE and Sumitomo recently announcing they are working to secure development rights for two fixed-bottom foundation sites.

Read this month's Windpower Monthly page-by-page online

Read this month's Windpower Monthly page-by-page online

For the June issue, Windpower Monthly will be published in a digital format rather than print until measures to fight the Covid-19 pandemic in the UK are lifted.

Utility cash brings full-scale 15MW Nezzy2 within reach

Utility cash brings full-scale 15MW Nezzy2 within reach

Aerodyn-engineering has joined forces with utility EnBW to accelerate the commercial development of the radical 15MW Nezzy2 twin-rotor offshore floater. Eize de Vries met company representatives at the test site.

Equinor to lead oil and gas majors' renewables spending

Equinor to lead oil and gas majors' renewables spending

Ten oil and gas majors are expected to invest $17.5 billion in wind and solar over the next five years, but most of this outlay will be spent by just one company, according to new analysis.

German energy firms in bid to halt E.on-RWE deal

German energy firms in bid to halt E.on-RWE deal

Eleven German municipal and regional energy companies have filed legal action with the European Court of Justice (ECJ) to stop the proposed merger of RWE and E.on.

PARTNER CONTENT

In Depth

Explainer: The hidden costs of oil storage

With the influx of renewables on the grid in recent years and the slump in demand due to Covid-19 health crisis, the price of oil has plummeted. So is there case to be made to store up oil at these low costs for when times are hard? Or should the global pandemic be the catalyst to leaving oil in the ground? We take a look at some of the figures.

What role for wind as Europe prepares for life after Covid-19?

After March and April saw the industry battle huge challenges as the coronavirus epidemic swept the globe, May saw its attention turn to what the new normal could look like once the health threat fades.

Supply-chain disruption and lockdowns trigger OEM losses

As lockdowns and travel restrictions forced factory closures and paralysed the supply chain, the lack of visibility of the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic caused Vestas, Siemens Gamesa Renewable Energy (SGRE), and Nordex to suspend their full-year guidance.

WindEconomics: How will wind fare after the Covid-19 pandemic?

The price of oil in a key American market fell to zero in April, and the price of gas is also at an all-time low. The picture in Europe is similar. According to the US Energy Information Administration, the natural gas wholesale price in late April was hovering around $1.7/million Btu (MMBtu), which corresponds to around $6/MWh.

Opinion

SGRE: picking up the turbine pace

The merger of Siemens and Gamesa was never going to be a simple affair. Two major multinational wind-turbine manufacturers pursuing separate markets with different turbine technologies might have made all kinds of sense as a business plan on paper, but threw up all manner of questions about how that could actually be achieved on the production floors and at project sites.

Repowering is key to true 'transition'

There was always something slightly dispiriting about the phrase "energy transition". It represented something sluggish and recalcitrant -- a creeping, crawling process through conferences and committees about how shifting from dirty and resource-finite sources to clean and sustainable energy could be managed in the prevailing economic and political circumstances.

Coronavirus has changed our world drastically, but we still have a job to do

This column is generally written with the reasonable expectation that the world will not have radically changed in the seven to ten days it takes to get from this keyboard to your intray. That is clearly not the case on this occasion.

Details needed over UK's onshore wind reprieve

The UK government’s effective ban on the development of onshore wind was impossible to reconcile with a target of net-zero emissions by 2050.

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